SUICIDE IN ADOLESCENTS

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Why Do People Commit Suicide?
AD/HD In Adults
Alcoholism — A Treatable Disease
Alcoholism, Drug Addiction, and Mental Health
Anxiety Disorders Strike Millions Each Year
Codependency: The Most Basic Addiction
Couple/Marriage Counseling Considerations
Finding the Right Care
Mental Health Needs and Older Adults
Millions With Depression Suffer Unnecessarily
Postpartum Depression (PPD)
Stigma of Mental Illness Still Widespread
Stress Management
Suicide — Why Does It Happen?
The State of North Carolina’s Mental Health System
Thoughts for the Grieving
Treating Mental Illness Makes Sense
Women and Depression
No suicide attempt should be dismissed or treated lightly!

A suicide attempt is a clear indication that something is gravely wrong in a person’s life. No matter the race or age of the person; how rich or poor they are, it is true that most people who commit suicide have a mental or emotional disorder.
The most common underlying disorder is depression, 30% to 70% of suicide victims suffer from major depression or bipolar (manicdepressive) disorder.
Warning Signs of Someone Considering Suicide

Any one of these symptoms does not necessarily mean the person is suicidal, but several of these symptoms may signal a need for help:
• Verbal suicide threats such as, “You’d be better off without me.” or “Maybe I won’t be around.”
• Expressions of hopelessness and helplessness.
• Previous suicide attempts.
• Daring or risk-taking behavior.
• Personality changes.
• Depression.
• Giving away prized possessions.
• Lack of interest in future plans.
Remember: Eight out of ten suicidal persons give some sign of their intentions. People who talk about suicide, threaten to commit suicide, or call suicide crisis centers are 30 times more likely than average to kill themselves.

Suicide and Adolescents

Over the past 60 years, the overall rate of suicide among adolescents has tripled making it the third leading cause of death among 15-to-25-year-olds and the second leading cause of death among college students.
It’s important for parents, teachers and counselors to become familiar with the facts about teens and young adults, especially when it comes to depression and suicide. When teens’ moods disrupt their ability to function on a day-to day basis, it may indicate a serious emotional or mental disorder that needs attention – adolescent depression. Sometimes teens feel so depressed that they consider ending their lives.
Studies show that suicide attempts among young people may be based on long standing problems triggered by a specific event. Suicidal adolescents may view a temporary situation as a permanent condition. Feelings of anger and resentment combined with exaggerated guilt can lead to impulsive, self-destructive acts.
Recognizing The Warning Signs

Four out of five teens who attempt suicide have given clear warnings. Pay attention to these warning signs:
• Suicide threats, direct and indirect
• Obsession with death
• Poems, essays and drawings that refer to death
• Dramatic change in personality or appearance
• Irrational, bizarre behavior
• Overwhelming sense of guilt, shame or reflection
• Changed eating or sleeping patterns
• Severe drop in school performance
• Giving away belongings
What To Do If You Think Someone Is Suicidal

Trust your instincts that the person may be in trouble.
Talk with the person about your concerns. Communication needs to include LISTENING.
Ask direct questions without being judgmental. Determine if the person has a specific plan to carry out the suicide. The more detailed the plan, the greater the risk.
Get professional help, even if the person resists.
Do not leave the person alone.

Do not swear to secrecy.

Do not act shocked or judgmental.

Do not counsel the person yourself.

Helping Suicidal Teens

Offer help and listen. Encourage depressed teens to talk about their feelings. Listen, don’t lecture.
Trust your instincts. If it seems that the situation may be serious, seek prompt help. Break a confidence if necessary, in order to save a life.
Pay attention to talk about suicide. Ask direct questions and don’t be afraid of frank discussions. Silence is deadly!
Seek professional help. It is essential to seek expert advice from a mental health professional who has experience helping depressed teens. Also, alert key adults in the teen’s life – family, friends and teacher.
Helping a Suicidal Person

No single therapeutic approach is suitable for all suicidal persons or suicidal tendencies. The most common ways to treat underlying illnesses associated with suicide are with medication, talk therapy or a combination of the two.
Cognitive (talk therapy) and behavioral (changing behavior) therapies aim at relieving the despair of suicidal patients by showing them other solutions to their problems and new ways to think about themselves and their world. Behavioral methods, such as training in assertiveness, problem-solving, social skills, and muscle relaxation, may reduce depression, anxiety, and social ineptitude.
Cognitive and behavioral homework assignments are planned in collaboration with the patient and explained as experiments that will be educational even if they fail. The therapist emphasizes that the patient is doing most of the work, because it is especially important for a suicidal person not to see the therapist as necessary for their survival. Recent research strongly supports the use of medication to treat the underlying depression associated with suicide. Antidepressant medication acts on chemical pathways of the brain related to mood. There are many very effective antidepressants.
Antidepressant medications are not habit-forming. Although some symptoms such as insomnia, often improve within a week or two, it may take three or four weeks before you feel better; the full benefit of medication may require six to eight weeks of treatment. Sometimes changes need to be made in dosage or medication type before improvements are noticed. It is usually recommended that medications be taken for at least four to nine months after the depressive symptoms have improved. People with chronic depression may need to stay on medication to prevent or lessen further episodes.
Never discontinue medication without discussing the decision with your doctor first.

If you or someone you know is contemplating suicide, contact 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784- 2433) or http://www.hopeline.com. If someone you know is about to take their own life, call 911.

For more information on suicide:
800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433)
http://www.hopeline.com
This will connect you with a crisis center in your area.
The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
3615 Wisconsin Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20016-3007
Phone: (202) 966-7300
http://www.aacap.org
American Association of Suicidology
5221 Wisconsin Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20015
Phone: (202) 237-2280
http://www.suicidology.org
Suicide Prevention Action Network USA (SPAN USA)
1025 Vermont Avenue, NW, Suite 1066
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: (202) 449-3600
http://www.spanusa.org
Information for this article was taken from the National Mental Health Association web site http://www.nmha.org
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Hearing Impaired
Phones for the Deaf

What’s Available in Cell Phones for the Deaf, Hard of Hearing?

WHY TEXTING AND E MAILING ARE A LIFE SAVER TO THE DEAF AND HARD – OF – HEARING COMMUNITY

Frequent texting on your cell phone isn’t just for college students and others who use the service insatiably. For the deaf and hard-of-hearing (HOH) community, texting is the lifeblood of a cell phone’s usefulness.

But specifically what’s available in cell phones to cater to those who are deaf or hard of hearing?
Answer: The simplest answer to this question is to say that most of today’s phones (even the most basic) serve the basic need of the deaf and HOH community: texting. Texting is often commonly referred to as sending SMS (short message system) messages. Texting for the deaf is like talking for the hearing.

The primary benefit of texting via cell phones for the deaf and HOH is that the compact, lightweight, convenient and affordable technology easily rests in their pockets and unshackles them from being reliant on TTY (TeleTYpewriter) technology. TTY is a specialized text telephone service whereby the conversation is typed instead of spoken.

In the past, the problem the deaf and HOH community had with their cell phone service was a lack of customization to their needs. For example, a cell phone plan might cost $50 with a certain amount of minutes and then $10 extra for unlimited texting.

These customers, though, wouldn’t need any of the voice minutes and would only want the texting. The money spent on the voice minutes would be wasted.

Cell phone carriers initially didn’t want to offer texting-only plans because those bills would earn them less recurring money. Over the years, though, fierce cell phone competition has forced some carriers to change their minds.

For example, T-Mobile has packages with data only (no voice) for the deaf or HOH. T-Mobile is among the more friendly companies among the major carriers for the deaf and HOH community. In addition, “some service providers have deaf-related offerings such as captioned movie information,” according to About.com deafness guide Jamie Berk.

While any modern cell phone today offers text messaging, those with a full keypad make frequent texting more convenient and faster to perform for the deaf and HOH. The first iPhone and the iPhone 3G for AT&T, the Samsung Instinct for Sprint, various BlackBerry models and the T-Mobile Sidekick are all excellent examples of advanced phones that facilitate the fast and heavy use of texting and e-mailing.

More specifically, the Sidekick 3, Sidekick ID, Sidekick LX, Sidekick Slide, BlackBerry Curve, BlackBerry 8700, BlackBerry Pearl 8100 are all recommended for the hearing impaired.

It should also be noted that the deaf and HOH who wear hearing aids may experience interference with cell phones. When experiencing this adverse side effect, these consumers are recommended to keep their cell phones as far away from the hearing aid as possible.

Hands-free accessories along with induction neck loops assist in this issue by lessening electronic interference. GoAmerica specifically combats this problem by offering hearing-aid compatible (HAC) phones such as the Jitterbug.

Many companies offer various accessories to assist the deaf and HOH community including Harris Communications (a “one-stop communications source” for the deaf and HOH, Fuse Wireless (various phones for the hearing impaired) and United TTY Wireless.

BACK IN THE SWIRL, Excerpt

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… – TAKE BABY STEPS, DON’T BEAT YOURSELF UP ABOUT ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE NOT ABLE TO DO AT THIS TIME. YOU ARE FOCUSED ON RECOVERING YOURSELF.IF YOU ONLY MANAGED TO TAKE A WALK OUT OF THE HOUSE FOR TEN SOLID MINUTES INSTEAD OF HALF AN HOUR APPLAUD YOURSELF. IF ANY GIVEN DAY, YOU ONLY MANAGE TO DO THE LAUNDRY, FOLD OUT THE CLOTHES AND PREPARE PEANUT BUTTER SANDWICHES FOR YOUR KIDS, IT’S OKAY. YOU HAVE BEEN SERIOUSLY COMMITTED TO TAKE YOUR MEDS? GIVE YOURSELF A REWARD. YOU ARE CHECKING INTO THAT REHAB FACILITY YOU HAVE ALWAYS THOUGHT YOU DIDN’T NEED IT BECAUSE YOU COULD CONTROL YOUR ADDICTIONS? Give yourself an outstanding ovation. Focus on your achievements no matter how little they may seem. Cast out all negative thoughts. Congratulate yourself and celebrate your accomplishments! You deserve it !

Back in the Swirl: Coping with Meniere’s Disease,
Migraine,
Chronic Depression
and Baffled Doctors

Available at

Amazon Kindle
Trafford Publishing, Print Edition

Because depression does not govern your life…

Nutritious and Tasty: The 4 cheeses with the lowest amount of calories

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Just because you are on a diet whether it is a personal decision or one of those that your doctor has made for you, that doesn’t mean that you have to give up entirely on a very nutritious and universally loved food: cheese.

Known as a good source of protein, phosphorus,and calcium cheese is equally delectable when paired with fruits, crackers, salads, pasta, omelets, hamburgers and ultimately a great Pinot Noir or any wine of your preference.

If you are choosing and counting every single calorie that reaches your palate here is the list of four winners to grace your table.

Swiss. At only 55 mg of sodium per ounce is one of the lowest sodium cheeses you may encounter.
If you are watching your salt intake due to high blood pressure, kidney disease, or fluid retention this cheese will add extra flavor to your sandwiches. Not to mention that it has only 100 calories per slice and 4 grams of fat.

PARMIGIAN or PARMESAN. My favorite from this list. Parmigian has a very particular flavor that for some reason I associate it with passion and character strength. There is no middle ground with parmigian cheese.

PARMESAN cheese is very high in calcium, a good option in your fight against osteoporosis and to strengthen bones. However, it is equally high in sodium content. Not a good choice if your diet is salt restricted. If you don’t have any sodium restrictions to worry about go for it. You can always sprinkle out on your salads to boost their flavor.
Paired with a strong red wine and some grapes? Simply irresistible!

FETA CHEESE

Feta cheese is traditionally made out of sheep or goat milk. Domestic feta is made out of cow milk. Both types are high in sodium however, a slice of FETA contains only about 80 calories, one of the lowest amounts among cheese selections. It also provides about 4 grams of protein per serving.

MOZZARELLA.

Mozzarella sticks are a fabulous way to curb your hunger between meals.
A low fat mozzarella stick is about 80 calories only. It provides 222 mg of calcium and about 7 grams of protein.
So these are basically the Four M you can rely on to keep on your calories intake within check.
Go ahead,you can say cheese now before and after your picture is taken.